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Email pacing4parkinsons@gmail.com!

Meet the 2019 Committee
Aliya Reich and mother Sara
Aliya Reich and mother Sara
Aliya Reich, Volunteer Chair
Aliya came to be involved with Pacing for Parkinson's after running the Baltimore Running Festival 5k in 2013 and just happened to walk by the P4P tent. The rest was history! The P4P cause is of particular meaning to Aliya because both of her grandfathers suffered from Parkinson's Disease, and her mother has been coping with its effects herself since 2007. 2019 marks Aliya’s third year as co-chair of the committee, her fifth year on the committee, and her sixth year running with the team. Aliya has raised more than $15,000 for P4P since 2014.
 
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Chelsea Ganc, Center Chair
Chelsea Ganc is the Johns Hopkins Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Center’s Health Educator. As a patient educator, Chelsea is responsible for coordinating outreach events and raising awareness about Parkinson's Disease. As this year’s co-chair, Chelsea hopes to bring a sense of community and empowerment to all those involved with P4P!
 
Tom and his family
Tom and his family
Tom Cosentino
My Parkinson's journey started in the fall of 2015 when I was tentatively diagnosed as having Parkinson's. My official diagnosis was in February of 2016. Since then I was fortunate enough to meet four individuals who helped me greatly on my journey to where I am today. If it wasn't for them I truly believe my life would be different today. It is now my turn to give back and that's why I'm here.
 
Genevieve, center, with family members.
Genevieve, center, with family members.
Genevieve Coyle
I first stumbled upon P4P while registering for the Baltimore Marathon in 2017. My grandmother had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s many years prior, and this team seemed like the perfect way to support her. And, when she passed away in the summer of 2017, I felt even more motivated to honor her through this team. After, meeting other P4P members at the race that fall, and learning about all the remarkable programs the P4P raised funds support, I realized what a wonderful community P4P has developed. This is my third year running with P4P, and my first year on the committee. I am looking forward to helping this amazing organization continue to grow and make a difference!
 
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Ryan Dreibelbis
I started with P4P in 2015 and became more active with the committee in 2017, authoring the Parkinson's Warriors series. My dad, Dan, has been diagnosed with Parkinson's since 2008. I hope that working on the committee can help others experience the feeling of community I get from P4P.
 
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Cédric Héda
My name is Cédric, I’m French, I arrived in August 2018. I come from Paris and I live in Silver Spring for 2 years. I decided to get involved in Pacing For Parkinson’s because I’m the president of a French association and I help people affected by the disease. Since 2009 my mother has Parkinson's disease and I give a lot of my time to help research through many projects. The challenge to do more is always there and if I can help P4P to achieve these goals I'd be happy. I run a lot of miles, I run for my mother and I run for all the people who have the disease. I always say, a smile, a thought or a gesture cost nothing but can do very much pleasure. My favorite sentence is: “If you can't fly then run, if you can't run then walk, if you can't walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward” (Martin Luther King, Jr.).
 
Team Hobart in 2017, with Kathy at center
Team Hobart in 2017, with Kathy at center
Kathy Hobart
I came to P4P largely through running in the Baltimore Running Festival. My husband had been recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s and I was searching for a way to DO something. As a result, I met many wonderful people associated with Pacing for Parkinson’s and from there it was an easy step to become actively involved. I look forward to participating in many events as well as become educated about Parkinson’s and an advocate for those facing the challenges of Parkinson’s.
 
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Kaylin Kopcho
Kaylin Kopcho is also a development officer for the Johns Hopkins Department of Neurology and was the 2018 co-chair for the Pacing for Parkinson's committee. In her role at Hopkins, Kaylin connects the passions of individuals and organizations with philanthropic investment opportunities in the Division of Neuroimmunology and Neurological Infections and the Division of Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders. She has been involved with Pacing for Parkinson's since 2015 and served on its committee since 2016.
 
Nicole and her father
Nicole and her father
Nicole Nicholson
I began running with Pacing for Parkinson’s in 2013 at the Baltimore Running Festival. My dad had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s and I couldn’t think of a better way to help support Parkinson’s research than by doing something I already loved to do… RUN! Since 2013, I’ve moved away from the east coast and in 2018 I decided I wanted to find a way to connect with the Pacing for Parkinson’s community again. I became a virtual runner and I have loved getting to know people through my own races as they come up and talk about their own stories and connections to Parkinson’s. This year, I’m looking forward to helping everyone find different ways to connect over this very special cause!
 
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Jenna Scott
I love running and anything fitness related. I was so excited to discover Pacing for Parkinson's on the Baltimore Running Festival website in 2013. My Granny had Parkinson's at the time and it was an amazing way to feel like I was making a difference in the Parkinson's community and to have the chance to connect with  other supportive people who were in a similar position to myself. There are so many exercise programs for people with Parkinson's that I have learned about while running for P4P that I did not know about while my Granny was battling Parkinson’s. My hope in running for P4P is to raise awareness and education on Parkinson’s so that families and individuals never feel like they are handling this alone. When I feel tired or fatigued during runs, I think of my Granny and all of the other people with Parkinson’s now and it motivates me to never give up and to run even harder. This year I am extremely grateful to be a part of the P4P committee! 
 
Brian, far right between his niece and daughter
Brian, far right between his niece and daughter
Brian Trees
I have participated in Pacing for Parkinson’s since my 21 and 20 year old daughters were in elementary school. The cause is important to me because my dad had Parkinson’s and received so much support and guidance from Johns Hopkins. My mother, who was his caregiver for so many years, was a member of the support group and this was important to her. Everyone on the team is so motivated that it makes every year better (even as I run slower) and the camaraderie at the tent is always great. Since I’ve participated in the event for so many years, I wanted to help in more ways as part of the committee. Pictured: Brian, far right between his niece and daughter, as part of Team Trees, which “Sticks Together” to support Pacing for Parkinson’s.
 
Mykaela, left, with a family member
Mykaela, left, with a family member
Mykaela Trees
I have been a member of the P4P team since 2013. When I was younger my dad was a part of P4P and began running on the team again in 2013 with more of our family. I was inspired to join P4P because my Pop Pop had Parkinson’s. Johns Hopkins did so much to support my Pop Pop and it is important to me to help Johns Hopkins give that continued strong support to others with Parkinson’s. This year I wanted to do more for the team and am excited to be a part of the P4P committee!
 
And finally, though he's retired from the committee, we are forever grateful to our Founding Chair, Paul DeLuca!
Paul DeLuca, along with daughter Grace and wife Shellie
Paul DeLuca, along with daughter Grace and wife Shellie
I decided to get involved in Pacing for Parkinson’s because the need was genuine.  The JHU PDMD center is committed to improving the lives of PD patients and their families.  The challenge to do more is always there, and if we can help to enable even a few more programs it is well worth my time. This organization allows me to not only give back to an organization that benefitted my family tremendously, but also gives me an extreme amount of personal satisfaction that I am somehow able to bring those affected by Parkinson’s Disease closer as a community so that they can help each other.
 
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Thank you from the faculty & staff at the Johns Hopkins Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center!

We hope to see you on October 19, 2019!